North Korean fishermen ‘killed 16 colleagues’ earlier than fleeing to South

A file picture of a North Korean fishing boat, taken in December 2018Picture copyright
Getty Photos

Picture caption

A file image of a North Korean fishing boat, taken in December 2018


Two North Korean fishermen suspected of killing 16 fellow crew members earlier than fleeing to the South, have been handed again to the North.

They crossed the maritime border on Saturday and had been later detained by authorities within the South.


South Korea often grants asylum to defectors however mentioned that on this case, the 2 males posed a menace to nationwide safety.

They had been handled as criminals – fairly than defectors – and despatched again.

After crossing the border on their squid fishing boat, it took two days for the South Korean navy to grab them.

In response to the Yonhap information company, citing officers, the 2 confessed that they and one other man killed the captain in late October due to his harsh remedy.

They then killed the opposite protesting crew members, one after the other. The our bodies had been dumped overboard.

The three suspects initially returned to the North – however when one among them was captured by native police at a port, the opposite two determined to flee on their boat to the South.

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AFP

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The 2 had been handed over at Panmunjom within the DMZ

The unification ministry in Seoul instructed the BBC that “after we could not belief their intention of defection” they determined to not enable the “critical criminals” to remain.

The 2 males of their 20s had been handed over to the North on the border village of Panmunjom within the demilitarised zone, he mentioned.

It’s the South’s first deportation of North Koreans by way of Panmunjom. There isn’t any extradition settlement between North and South.

Defectors on the Korean peninsula are often residents of the North who attempt to escape from the closed-off dictatorship to the democratic and wealthier South.

Such defections are very harmful. In some circumstances troopers have crossed the border on foot, typically underneath a hail of bullets.

There have been 1,127 defections from North to South in 2017, based on knowledge from Seoul.

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Media caption4 defectors speak about what life is like in North Korea

Defectors are often interrogated by South Korean intelligence authorities, and spend time in a government-run facility for re-education, earlier than being launched into society.

Most North Koreans who flee accomplish that by way of China, which has the longer border with North Korea. It’s simpler to cross than the heavily-protected Demilitarised Zone (DMZ) between the 2 Koreas.

China regards defectors as unlawful migrants, fairly than refugees, and sometimes forcibly repatriates them.